Tag Archives: nature

Simple Pleasures Saturday

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Today I was able to work in the yard for a little bit.  We had a tree and a bush cut down as well.  Some people don’t like yard work because it can be rather laborious, but working outside really soothes me.

There is something about working so close to the earth that makes me feel closer to God.  Maybe because we are made from the earth.  It is my quiet time to reflect.  I take pleasure in appreciating God’s gifts of nature.  I also enjoy having a neat and attractive yard.

I spent my time raking leaves, sticks, and trash that was hidden under the bush.  While raking, a long “stick” walked across my foot!  I am repulsed by bugs and was a bit frightened by the “stick.”  I looked at him closely and noticed his square head and observant eyes.  His underbody was a vivid green color. 

I thought he was a walking stick and called my neighbor over to confirm it. The “stick” was actually a preying mantis.  He seemed friendly enough and didn’t bother me, so I continued with my work while he surveyed the scene.  However, I kept a careful watch on him from the corner of my eye.  I didn’t want him to pounce on me unexpectantly. After all, he did traipse across my foot without permission!  I soon became fascinated with this little creature and grabbed my camera.

My Little Friend

My Little Friend

I plan to spend a little bit of time each day getting things ready for the fall.  I would like to winterize the grass, clean out the flowerbeds, remove the summer decorations from the porch and replace them with autumn items, trim the bushes one last time, and eventually rake the leaves once they begin falling.

Human Goodness

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This is a very thought-provoking piece of writing by Margaret J. Wheatley.  This quote really resonates with me:

In these times of turmoil, we’ve forgotten who we can be and we’ve let our worst natures prevail. Some of these bad behaviors we created because we treat people in non-human ways. We’ve taken the very things that make us human–our emotions, our imagination, our need for meaning–and dismissed them as unimportant. We’ve found it more convenient to treat humans as replaceable parts in the machinery of production. We’ve organized work around destructive motivations–greed, self-interest, competition.

You may read the rest of this essay at:  http://www.margaretwheatley.com/articles/relyingonhumangoodness.html